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The Map Room: Archives (March 2003)

Monday, March 31, 2003

Matthew White’s Twentieth Century

Rebecca points to Matthew White’s Historical Atlas of the Twentieth Century, a collection of maps, charts and other historical data that he apparently has compiled or drawn himself. Lots of data (and opinion!), though the graphics are a little crude. But don’t miss his massive historical maps links page.

Posted by Jonathan Crowe at 9:16 AM

Iconomy’s Map Links

I’ve always been jealous of Iconomy; she has the bestest posts on MetaFilter and finds the most interesting web things. In the midst of a map frame of mind herself, she presents three, count ’em, three links to map sites: this page of cartographic curiosities, including caricatures in the shapes of countries; this collection of literary maps, i.e., maps of places that exist only in books; and, though I myself have never been a fan of Hardy, these maps of Hardy’s Wessex.

Posted by Jonathan Crowe at 9:06 AM

Maps of Iraq and the Perry-Castañena Map Collection

This page of very good maps of Iraq was actually the impetus for this blog: it reminded me of my lifelong interest in maps, and made me realize that there was a wealth of material online about which I knew very little. It’s also an excellent segue to the equally excellent Perry-Castaņeda Map Collection at the University of Texas at Austin, where it’s easy to get lost among the high-resolution scans of many, many interesting maps.

Posted by Jonathan Crowe at 8:53 AM

Odden’s Bookmarks

What better way to begin a weblog focused on maps on the web than to link to Odden’s Bookmarks, a site with over 20,000 links to cartographic resources? I haven’t searched through this site much yet — where to begin? — but I’m sure I’ll be referring to it whenever I try to construct posts in the future. (via MetaFilter)

Posted by Jonathan Crowe at 8:45 AM